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Nature embraces Under

A series of new photos by Timon Koch shows how the underwater restaurant Under on the south coast of Norway has become embraced by nature three years after completion. 

The restaurant was designed to fully integrate into its marine environment over time, as the roughness of the submerged concrete shell was aimed to function as an artificial reef, welcoming limpets and kelp to inhabit it and supporting the rich biodiversity of the surrounding area.

We are thrilled to see the planned integrations coming to life and how nature has entirely inhabited the building, illustrated in these stunning new photographs by Timon Koch. 

Under, Europe's first underwater restaurant, was developed in close collaboration with the owners and marine biologists, resulting in a building where the chef can harvest dinner from the roof. 

After the initial building process, stones have also been added to the site's seabed. This supports an even better breeding ground for adhering organisms, providing food and shelter for many other species. Especially mussels have become an important part of the menu in the restaurant, and the kitchen continues its meticulous focus on using every ingredient possible, also items not normally used for food.

As well as creating unique experiences for the visitors, Under was designed to give people greater insight into life in the sea. Situated in Lindesnes, where the less salty water from the Baltic Sea meets the very salty Atlantic Ocean, the location is ideal in a marine biological context. This diverse ocean creates an accumulation of both the species that thrive best in partly brackish water and those that thrive best in salty sea, creating a peak of species diversity. 

Over the last few years, the marine biologists have been able to study underwater life and fish behavior up-close without disturbing, leading to unique insights and even the rediscovery of species thought to be obsolete. 
 

See more photos in this article in Dezeen 

Press can download high-res images here
 
All photos by Timon Koch